Factor out the kernel loading function. Add kernel_min, kernel_max addresses.
[virt-mem.git] / virt-mem.1
index eb35098..94be74d 100644 (file)
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-.\" Automatically generated by Pod::Man v1.37, Pod::Parser v1.32
+.\" Automatically generated by Pod::Man 2.16 (Pod::Simple 3.05)
 .\"
 .\" Standard preamble:
 .\" ========================================================================
 ..
 .\" Set up some character translations and predefined strings.  \*(-- will
 .\" give an unbreakable dash, \*(PI will give pi, \*(L" will give a left
-.\" double quote, and \*(R" will give a right double quote.  | will give a
-.\" real vertical bar.  \*(C+ will give a nicer C++.  Capital omega is used to
-.\" do unbreakable dashes and therefore won't be available.  \*(C` and \*(C'
-.\" expand to `' in nroff, nothing in troff, for use with C<>.
-.tr \(*W-|\(bv\*(Tr
+.\" double quote, and \*(R" will give a right double quote.  \*(C+ will
+.\" give a nicer C++.  Capital omega is used to do unbreakable dashes and
+.\" therefore won't be available.  \*(C` and \*(C' expand to `' in nroff,
+.\" nothing in troff, for use with C<>.
+.tr \(*W-
 .ds C+ C\v'-.1v'\h'-1p'\s-2+\h'-1p'+\s0\v'.1v'\h'-1p'
 .ie n \{\
 .    ds -- \(*W-
 .    ds R" ''
 'br\}
 .\"
+.\" Escape single quotes in literal strings from groff's Unicode transform.
+.ie \n(.g .ds Aq \(aq
+.el       .ds Aq '
+.\"
 .\" If the F register is turned on, we'll generate index entries on stderr for
 .\" titles (.TH), headers (.SH), subsections (.Sh), items (.Ip), and index
 .\" entries marked with X<> in POD.  Of course, you'll have to process the
 .\" output yourself in some meaningful fashion.
-.if \nF \{\
+.ie \nF \{\
 .    de IX
 .    tm Index:\\$1\t\\n%\t"\\$2"
 ..
 .    nr % 0
 .    rr F
 .\}
-.\"
-.\" For nroff, turn off justification.  Always turn off hyphenation; it makes
-.\" way too many mistakes in technical documents.
-.hy 0
-.if n .na
+.el \{\
+.    de IX
+..
+.\}
 .\"
 .\" Accent mark definitions (@(#)ms.acc 1.5 88/02/08 SMI; from UCB 4.2).
 .\" Fear.  Run.  Save yourself.  No user-serviceable parts.
 .\" ========================================================================
 .\"
 .IX Title "VIRT-MEM 1"
-.TH VIRT-MEM 1 "2008-06-10" "virt-mem-0.2.1" "Virtualization Support"
+.TH VIRT-MEM 1 "2008-07-24" "virt-mem-0.2.7" "Virtualization Support"
+.\" For nroff, turn off justification.  Always turn off hyphenation; it makes
+.\" way too many mistakes in technical documents.
+.if n .ad l
+.nh
 .SH "NAME"
 virt\-uname \- system information for virtual machines
 .PP
 virt\-dmesg \- print kernel messages for virtual machines
+.PP
+virt\-mem \- tool with additional information output
 .SH "SUMMARY"
 .IX Header "SUMMARY"
 virt-uname [\-options] [domains...]
 .PP
 virt-dmesg [\-options] [domains...]
+.PP
+virt-mem uname [...]
+.PP
+virt-mem dmesg [...]
+.PP
+virt-mem [\-options]
 .SH "DESCRIPTION"
 .IX Header "DESCRIPTION"
-These virtualization tools allow you to inspect the status of
-virtual machines running Linux.
+These virtualization tools allow you to inspect the status of virtual
+machines running Linux.
+.PP
+These tools are designed to work like familiar Linux/Unix command line
+tools.
+.PP
+These tools all use libvirt so are capable of showing information
+across a variety of different virtualization systems.
 .PP
-The tools all use libvirt so are capable of showing stats across a
-variety of different virtualization systems.
+The virt-mem tools do not work on domains which are not active
+(running or paused).  eg. They do not work on shut down domains.
+However they can (usually) be used on domains which are active but
+hanging or unresponsive.  You also have the option of capturing a
+memory image of a domain for post-mortem analysis, allowing you to
+quickly reboot a failed domain and analyze it later at your leisure.
 .SH "COMMON OPTIONS"
 .IX Header "COMMON OPTIONS"
 Each command obeys a common set of options.  The general form is:
 .PP
 virt\-\fIprogram\fR [\-options] [domains...]
 .PP
-where \fIdomains\fR is a list of guest names to act on.  If no domains
-are specified then we act on all active domains by default.
+where \fIprogram\fR is a subtool such as \f(CW\*(C`uname\*(C'\fR, \f(CW\*(C`dmesg\*(C'\fR or \f(CW\*(C`ps\*(C'\fR, and
+\&\fIdomains\fR is a list of guest names to act on.  If no domains are
+specified then we act on all active domains by default.
 .PP
-A \fIdomain\fR may be specified either by its name or by its \s-1ID\s0.  Use
-\&\fIvirsh list\fR to get a list of active domain names and IDs.
+A \fIdomain\fR may be specified either by its name, by its \s-1ID\s0 or by its
+\&\s-1UUID\s0.  Use \fIvirsh list\fR to get a list of active domain names and IDs.
 .PP
-The virt-mem tools do not work on domains which are not active
-(running or paused).  eg. They do not work on shut down domains.
+Equivalently you can use the \f(CW\*(C`virt\-mem\*(C'\fR meta-tool with subcommands,
+as in:
+.PP
+virt-mem \fIprogram\fR [...]
+.PP
+The \f(CW\*(C`virt\-mem\*(C'\fR program offers additional features, such as the
+ability to capture \s-1VM\s0 images for post-mortem analysis (see below).
 .IP "\fB\-c uri\fR, \fB\-\-connect uri\fR" 4
 .IX Item "-c uri, --connect uri"
 Connect to libvirt \s-1URI\s0.  The default is to connect to the default
@@ -179,17 +210,22 @@ report a bug.
 Display usage summary.
 .IP "\fB\-t memoryimage\fR" 4
 .IX Item "-t memoryimage"
-Test mode.  Instead of checking libvirt for domain information, this
-runs the virt-mem tool directly on the memory image supplied.  You may
-specify the \fB\-t\fR option multiple times.
+Post-mortem analysis mode.
+.Sp
+Instead of checking libvirt for domain information, this runs the tool
+directly on the memory image supplied.  You may specify the \fB\-t\fR
+option multiple times.  Use the \f(CW\*(C`virt\-mem capture\*(C'\fR command to capture
+images (see below).
+.Sp
+See also the section \*(L"\s-1MEMORY\s0 \s-1IMAGES\s0\*(R" below.
 .IP "\fB\-\-version\fR" 4
 .IX Item "--version"
 Display version and exit.
 .IP "\fB\-E auto|littleendian|bigendian\fR" 4
 .IX Item "-E auto|littleendian|bigendian"
 .PD 0
-.IP "\fB\-T auto|i386|x86\-64|\f(BIaddress\fB\fR" 4
-.IX Item "-T auto|i386|x86-64|address"
+.IP "\fB\-T auto|i386|x86\-64|\f(BIaddress\fB|\f(BIaddress,min,max\fB\fR" 4
+.IX Item "-T auto|i386|x86-64|address|address,min,max"
 .IP "\fB\-W auto|32|64\fR" 4
 .IX Item "-W auto|32|64"
 .PD
@@ -203,13 +239,18 @@ to use these options if virt-mem tools get the automatic detection
 wrong.
 .Sp
 Endianness (\fI\-E\fR) sets the memory endianness, for data, pointers and
-so on.
+so on.  \fI\-E littleendian\fR is the endianness used on Intel i386,
+x86\-64 and (usually) \s-1IA64\s0.  \fI\-E bigendian\fR is the endianness used on
+many \s-1RISC\s0 chips such as \s-1SPARC\s0 and PowerPC.
 .Sp
-Text address (\fI\-T\fR) sets the base address of the kernel image.  \fI\-T
-i386\fR means to try some common addresses for i386\-based kernels.  \fI\-T
-x86\-64\fR means to try some common addresses for x86\-64\-based kernels.
-\&\fI\-T \fIaddress\fI\fR sets the address specifically (\fI0x\fR prefix is
-allowed to specify hex addresses).
+Text address (\fI\-T\fR) sets the base address and optionally min and max
+addresses of the kernel image.  \fI\-T i386\fR means to try some common
+addresses for i386\-based kernels.  \fI\-T x86\-64\fR means to try some
+common addresses for x86\-64\-based kernels.
+.Sp
+\&\fI\-T address\fR sets the kernel base address specifically (\fI0x\fR prefix
+is used to specify hex addresses).  \fI\-T address,min,max\fR sets the
+kernel base address, minimum address and maximum address.
 .Sp
 Word size (\fI\-W\fR) sets the word size, 32 or 64 bits.
 .IP "\fB\-A auto|i386|x86\-64|...\fR" 4
@@ -217,16 +258,50 @@ Word size (\fI\-W\fR) sets the word size, 32 or 64 bits.
 This option sets the architecture to one of a collection of known
 architectures.  It is equivalent to setting endianness and wordsize in
 one go, but not text address.
+.SH "virt-dmesg"
+.IX Header "virt-dmesg"
+This prints the latest kernel messages from the virtual machine, as if
+you were logged into the machine and used \fIdmesg\fR\|(1).
+.SH "virt-uname"
+.IX Header "virt-uname"
+This prints the contents of the system \f(CW\*(C`utsname\*(C'\fR structure, similar
+to what is printed by the \fIuname\fR\|(1) command.
+.SH "virt-mem"
+.IX Header "virt-mem"
+\&\f(CW\*(C`virt\-mem\*(C'\fR is a meta-tool which allows you to run all the commands
+above, and provides some extra features.
+.PP
+Instead of the preceeding commands such as \f(CW\*(C`virt\-dmesg\*(C'\fR you can
+write:
+.PP
+.Vb 1
+\& virt\-mem dmesg [...]
+.Ve
+.PP
+Options and other command line arguments work the same.
+.PP
+Additional \f(CW\*(C`virt\-mem\*(C'\fR subcommands are listed below.
+.Sh "virt-mem capture \-o memoryimage [\-options] [domains...]"
+.IX Subsection "virt-mem capture -o memoryimage [-options] [domains...]"
+Capture the memory image of a virtual machine for later post-mortem
+analysis.  Use the \fI\-t memoryimage\fR option for any other virt-mem
+tool to analyze the memory image later.
+.PP
+The \fI\-o memoryimage\fR option is required, and is used to name the
+output file.  If a single guest is captured, then the output is saved
+in the \fImemoryimage\fR file.  However, if multiple guests are captured,
+then their images are saved in \fImemoryimage.ID\fR where \fI\s-1ID\s0\fR is
+replaced with the domain \s-1ID\s0.
+.PP
+See also the section \*(L"\s-1MEMORY\s0 \s-1IMAGES\s0\*(R" below.
 .SH "EXAMPLES"
 .IX Header "EXAMPLES"
 .Vb 3
-\& # virt-uname
-\& f9x32kvm: Linux localhost.localdomain 2.6.24-0.155.rc7.git6.fc9 #1
+\& # virt\-uname
+\& f9x32kvm: Linux localhost.localdomain 2.6.24\-0.155.rc7.git6.fc9 #1
 \& SMP Tue Jan 15 17:52:31 EST 2008 i686 (none)
-.Ve
-.PP
-.Vb 11
-\& # virt-dmesg f9x32kvm | tail
+\&
+\& # virt\-dmesg f9x32kvm | tail
 \& <6>Bluetooth: Core ver 2.11
 \& <6>NET: Registered protocol family 31
 \& <6>Bluetooth: HCI device and connection manager initialized
@@ -238,25 +313,42 @@ one go, but not text address.
 \& <6>Bluetooth: RFCOMM ver 1.8
 \& <7>eth0: no IPv6 routers present
 .Ve
+.SH "MEMORY IMAGES"
+.IX Header "MEMORY IMAGES"
+All the tools can read dumped kernel images, using the common
+\&\fI\-t memoryimage\fR option.  In addition you can capture memory
+images from domains for post-mortem analysis using the
+\&\f(CW\*(C`virt\-mem capture\*(C'\fR command (see above).
+.PP
+The memory images which are saved by \f(CW\*(C`virt\-mem capture\*(C'\fR contain a
+header and some additional information about the kernel image, such as
+architecture, original text address, and so forth.  Thus these images
+can be reanalysed just using the \fI\-t memoryimage\fR option.
+.PP
+We also support analyzing raw kernel dumps, eg. produced using the
+\&\fIqemu\fR\|(1) monitor's \f(CW\*(C`memsave\*(C'\fR command.  In this case however you
+usually need to specify the original architecture, text address and
+perhaps other details using the \fI\-A\fR, \fI\-T\fR and other command line
+parameters.
 .SH "SHORTCOMINGS"
 .IX Header "SHORTCOMINGS"
 The virt-mem tools spy on the guest's memory image.  There are some
 shortcomings to this, described here.
-.PP
-(1) Only works on specific, tested releases of Linux kernels.  Support
+.IP "\(bu" 4
+Only works on specific, tested releases of Linux kernels.  Support
 for arbitrary Linux kernel versions may be patchy because of changes
 in the internal structures used.  Support for non-Linux kernels is
-currently non\-existent, and probably impossible for Windows because of
+currently non-existent, and probably impossible for Windows because of
 lack of an acceptable source license.
-.PP
-(2) Heuristics are used which may mean in the worst case that the
+.IP "\(bu" 4
+Heuristics are used which may mean in the worst case that the
 output is wrong.
-.PP
-(3) Structures which are frequently modified may cause errors.  This
+.IP "\(bu" 4
+Structures which are frequently modified may cause errors.  This
 could be a problem if, for example, the process table in the guest is
 being rapidly updated.
-.PP
-(4) We have to scan memory to find kernel symbols, etc., which can be
+.IP "\(bu" 4
+We have to scan memory to find kernel symbols, etc., which can be
 quite slow.  Optimizing the memory scanner would help, and caching the
 base address of the symbol table(s) would make it dramatically faster.
 .SH "SECURITY"
@@ -268,7 +360,10 @@ example guests which set up malicious kernel memory.
 \&\fIuname\fR\|(1),
 \&\fIdmesg\fR\|(1),
 \&\fIvirsh\fR\|(1),
+\&\fIvirt\-top\fR\|(1),
+\&\fIvirt\-df\fR\|(1),
 \&\fIxm\fR\|(1),
+\&\fIqemu\fR\|(1),
 <http://www.libvirt.org/ocaml/>,
 <http://www.libvirt.org/>,
 <http://et.redhat.com/~rjones/>,
@@ -299,7 +394,7 @@ Foundation, Inc., 675 Mass Ave, Cambridge, \s-1MA\s0 02139, \s-1USA\s0.
 Bugs can be viewed on the Red Hat Bugzilla page:
 <https://bugzilla.redhat.com/>.
 .PP
-If you find a bug in virt\-mem, please follow these steps to report it:
+If you find a bug in virt-mem, please follow these steps to report it:
 .IP "1. Check for existing bug reports" 4
 .IX Item "1. Check for existing bug reports"
 Go to <https://bugzilla.redhat.com/> and search for similar bugs.