Fix typo in documentation of 'whenjobs --test' option.
[whenjobs.git] / tools / whenjobs.pod
index 20f0be5..85da381 100644 (file)
@@ -14,7 +14,7 @@ Editing the jobs script:
 Get and set variables:
 
  whenjobs --get variable
- whenjobs --set variable value [--type bool|int|float|string]
+ whenjobs --set variable=value [variable=value ...]
  whenjobs --variables
 
 Start and stop the per-user daemon:
@@ -29,6 +29,7 @@ Examine running jobs:
  whenjobs --jobs
  whenjobs --cancel serial
  whenjobs --start "name"
+ whenjobs --tail serial
 
 =head1 DESCRIPTION
 
@@ -42,7 +43,7 @@ Periodic jobs are written like this:
  <<
    # Get the current load average.
    load=`awk '{print $1}' /proc/loadavg`
-   whenjobs --set load $load --type float
+   whenjobs --set --type float load=$load
  >>
 
 When-statements let you create jobs that run based on variables set
@@ -79,7 +80,7 @@ command line tool to examine and set variables:
 
  $ whenjobs --variables
  load=0.9
- $ whenjobs --set cat sushi
+ $ whenjobs --set cat=sushi
  $ whenjobs --get cat
  sushi
 
@@ -126,6 +127,11 @@ C<vi> is used.
 
 Print the value of a variable.
 
+=item B<--job-names>
+
+List the names of all loaded jobs (whether they are running or not).
+Use I<--jobs> to list running jobs.
+
 =item B<--jobs>
 
 List all running jobs.
@@ -149,14 +155,7 @@ source, eg:
 
  whenjobs --lib $builddir/lib -e
 
-=item B<--start> "job name"
-
-Start the job immediately and unconditionally.
-
-This runs the job even if its normal preconditions are not met.  This
-may cause unexpected results, so use with caution.
-
-=item B<--set> variable value
+=item B<--set> variable=value [variable=value ...]
 
 =item B<--type> bool|int|float|string|unit
 
@@ -164,18 +163,56 @@ I<--set> sets the variable named C<variable> to the new C<value>.  The
 variable is created if it does not already exist.  Note that setting a
 variable can cause jobs to run immediately.
 
-To unset a variable, set it to the empty string:
+To unset a variable, set it to the empty string like this:
 
- whenjobs --set var ""
+ whenjobs --set var=
 
 By default variables are strings.  You can also set the type of a
-variable when setting it by adding the optional I<--type> parameter:
+variable when setting it by adding the optional I<--type> parameter.
+The I<--type> parameter should come I<before> the variable
+declaration, like this:
 
- whenjobs --set free_space 10000 --type int
+ whenjobs --set --type int free_space=10000
 
 See the discussion of variable types in the L</REFERENCE> section
 below.
 
+You can set multiple variables.  When setting multiple variables in a
+single command, the values are all changed in a single atomic
+operation.
+
+ whenjobs --set cat=sushi food=fish
+
+When using I<--type> and multiple variables, the type changes the
+remaining command line parameters until the next I<--type>, eg:
+
+ whenjobs --set cat=sushi --type float weight=3.5 --type string food=fish
+
+(C<cat> and C<food> are strings, and C<weight> is a float).
+
+=item B<--start> "job name"
+
+Start the job immediately and unconditionally.
+
+This runs the job even if its normal preconditions are not met.  This
+may cause unexpected results, so use with caution.
+
+=item B<--tail> serial
+
+Tail the output of the running job identified by its serial number.
+Use the I<--jobs> flag to get a list of running jobs.
+
+=item B<--test> variable=value [variable=value ...]
+
+This works the same way as the I<--set> option, but the difference is
+that the variables are not set.  Instead, it lists out the jobs that
+I<would> run, I<if> the variables were updated to these new values.
+
+The variables are not actually updated, and the jobs are not actually
+run.
+
+The output is a list of job names that would run.
+
 =item B<--upload>
 
 Compile the jobs script and upload it to the daemon, without editing.
@@ -403,6 +440,11 @@ that it had last time this when-job ran.
 
 If the when-job has not run yet, then this returns C<"">.
 
+Job state is preserved across file reloads, but I<only> for jobs that
+are explicitly named.  If you find that jobs using C<prev>, C<changes>
+etc are running unnecessarily when the jobs file is edited or
+uploaded, try giving the jobs an explicit name.
+
 =item B<changes> I<variable>
 
 If the named variable has changed since this job last ran, then this
@@ -592,6 +634,37 @@ this example:
    Whentools.set_variable "name" "Richard";
    Whentools.set_variable_int "counter" 0
 
+=head3 PRE FUNCTIONS
+
+Before a job runs, you can arrange that a C<pre> function is called.
+This function may decide not to run the job (by returning C<false>).
+
+One use for this is to prevent a particular job from running if there
+is already an instance of the same job running:
+
+ job "only one"
+ pre (Whentools.one ())
+ every 10 seconds :
+ <<
+   # Takes longer than 10 seconds to run, but 'Whentools.one ()'
+   # will ensure only one is ever running.
+   sleep 11
+ >>
+
+When using pre functions, jobs must be given an explicit name, ie.
+you must use the C<job> statement.
+
+A number of pre functions are available in the library; see below.
+
+You can also write your own post functions (in OCaml).  The function
+is passed one argument which is a C<Whentools.preinfo> struct, defined
+below.  It should return a boolean: C<true> if the job should run, and
+C<false> if the job should not run.
+
+Note that a fresh serial number (see L</JOBSERIAL>) is assigned to
+each run, whether or not the job actually runs because of
+preconditions.
+
 =head3 POST FUNCTIONS
 
 After a job runs, you can control what happens to its output by
@@ -621,7 +694,8 @@ defined below.
 =item B<Whentools.mailto> [I<~only_on_failure:true>]
 [I<~from:from_address>] I<email_address> I<result>
 
-Send the result of the script by email to the given email address.
+This built-in post function sends the result of the script by email to
+the given email address.
 
 If the optional C<~only_on_failure:true> flag is set, then it is only
 sent out if the script failed.
@@ -659,6 +733,22 @@ Here are some examples of using the mailto function:
    # do something
  >>
 
+=item B<Whentools.max> I<n>
+
+This built-in pre function ensures that a maximum of I<n> instances of
+the job are running.
+
+It checks the list of running jobs, and if I<n> or more instances are
+already running, then it returns C<false>, which ensures that the new
+job is not started.
+
+=item B<Whentools.one> I<()>
+
+This built-in pre function ensures that only one instance of the job
+is running.  It is the same as calling:
+
+ Whentools.max 1
+
 =item B<Whentools.set_variable> I<name> I<string>
 
 Set variable I<name> to the string.
@@ -686,6 +776,24 @@ Set variable I<name> to the floating point value I<f>.
 
 =over 4
 
+=item B<Whentools.preinfo>
+
+This structure is passed to pre functions.  It has the following
+fields:
+
+ type preinfo = {
+   pi_job_name : string;           # Job name.
+   pi_serial : Big_int.big_int;    # Job serial number.
+   pi_variables : (string * variable) list; # Variables set in job.
+   pi_running : preinfo_running_job list;   # List of running jobs.
+ }
+ and preinfo_running_job = {
+   pirun_job_name : string;        # Running job name.
+   pirun_serial : Big_int.big_int; # Running job serial number.
+   pirun_start_time : float;       # Running job start time.
+   pirun_pid : int;                # Running job process ID.
+ }
+
 =item B<Whentools.result>
 
 This structure is passed to post functions.  It has the following